Mecum Indianapolis 2015 – Auction Report

Mecum Indianapolis 2015 – Auction Report Page Six

1971 Plymouth GTX Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F207 1971 Plymouth GTX Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RS23R1G165445; Black, Matte Black hood, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl, cloth; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $140,400. With Reserve. 426/425hp, dual quads, 4-speed, P/S, P/B, Hurst pistol grip shifter, Air Grabber hood, bench seat with folding center armrest, Rallye wheels with trim rings, G60-15 Polyglas GT tires, leather rim steering wheel. – Said to be one of only eleven Hemi 4-speed ’71 GTXs. Very good older paint, chrome and interior. Underbody shows age and some use, but still nearly in showroom condition. – The ’71 redesign of the B-body Mopars did nothing for their appeal, but makes them a relatively good value for the purely performance-driven, as this transaction indicates. There are a lot of bragging rights in this GTX and they didn’t cost much.
1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback
Lot # F208 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 8T02S129533-00541; Acapulco Blue, White stripes/Black; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $145,800. With Reserve. 428/360 hp, 4-speed, P/S, P/B, tilt steering column, 10-spoke alloy wheels, Goodyear Speedway blackwall tires, Sport Deck rear seat, grille mounted fog lights, pushbutton radio. – An older restoration with a more recent repaint. Overspray in the wheelwells over old chassis paint. Upholstery is sound and quite likely original. A sound older restoration that has mellowed into a great driver. – This is a sound, reasonably presented car made even more desirable by its 4-speed and it brought an appropriate price for its equipment and presentation.
1966 Ford Bronco Utility
Lot # F213 1966 Ford Bronco Utility; S/N U14FL733983; Light Blue, White hard top/Gray vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $41,040. With Reserve. 105hp six, 3-speed, removable half cab, Hi-Lo transfer case, full wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, full size spare, bucket seats. – From the Rick Baker collection. First year Bronco restored 10 years ago. Paint looks good with a few flaws and touch ups. Panel fit is great. Engine compartment is clean, while showing some use. Underneath is very clean. Interior is immaculate. Brightwork looks new. A very good early Bronco with quality restoration work that leaves it looking much newer than it is. – Although this early Bronco is very good, this was still a huge price and another example of the growing market for vintage trucks. It’s more than an FJ40.
1970 Shelby Mustang GT350 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F222 1970 Shelby Mustang GT350 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0F2M482775; Gulfstream Aqua, Black, Gold stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $81,000. With Reserve. 351/300hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, 3.25 limited slip, Shelby mag wheels, Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, Philco AM radio, center console, Marti Report. – From the Rick Baker Ford collection. Good, shiny paint. The brightwork around the windshield is dull and scuffed. The engine is dusty and has a leaky carburetor. The underbody is clean and restored. The interior has been fully restored. A mostly original car with one repaint that is in well kept and very presentable condition. – Values for these second generation GT350s took a big nose dive in 2009 and have only slowly crept back up. This imperfect example, finished in a rare and pretty color combination, brought a very strong result and the seller should be quite happy with it. By 1970 there wasn’t much of Shelby left in the Shelby-badged GT350 and their values reflect only the badge.
1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F224 1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0T05R110842; Blue, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $81,000. With Reserve. 428/335hp, Cobra Jet, 4-speed, power steering, power brakes, shaker hood scoop, 3.91 limited slip, Magnum 500 wheels, BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires, center console, AM radio with 8-track player, Deluxe Marti Report. – From the Rick Baker Ford Collection. Largely original paint, the driver’s side fender and the nose have a few touched up gouges. Bumpers have been redone. There are paint runs on the passenger’s side A-pillar. The antenna tip is bent. The engine has been restored and then seen some use. The interior also is restored and well maintained. – Sold here three years ago for $53,000, it found a highly receptive audience that put a premium on its preservation.
1964 Mercury Comet Cyclone 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F231 1964 Mercury Comet Cyclone 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 4H27K571643; Peacock Turquoise/White vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $71,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $76,680. With Reserve. 289/271hp, 4- speed, chrome wheel style wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, 3.55 Traction-Lok, Centerforce clutch, buckets and console, tach, woodgrain steering wheel. – Excellent recent paint, chrome and interior. Performance and reliability modified, but invisibly, and highly attractive. – A rare high performance Comet with a better-then-new restoration but also a better than average price for it, an expensive car.
1953 Ford F-100 Pickup
Lot # F237 1953 Ford F-100 Pickup; S/N F10R3D26597; Glacier Blue/Blue vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $37,800. With Reserve. 239/106hp Flathead, 3-speed, dual exhaust, Ford heater, 50th anniversary emblem in steering wheel. – Beautiful body-off restored first year F100. Paint and panel fit are excellent. Brightwork is good and shiny. Engine bay is spotless and the undercarriage looks just as good. Interior looks new and shows no wear. A very solid restoration. – A beautifully restored truck and a milestone in pickup history, the buyer got full value for money at this price.
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F243 1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JH23J0B283936; Go Mango, Matte black hood/Burnt Orange vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Modified restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $60,480. With Reserve. 340/290 hp, Six Pack, 4-speed, Hurst pistol grip shifter, gauges, Sun oil pressure gauge, Rallye wheels with trim ring, Radial T/A tires, 3.54 Sure Grip, P/S, P/B, pushbutton radio, side outlet exhaust. – Originally an automatic (comes with the lot.) Restored like new and very fresh. Good fit on the fiberglass hood. Passenger’s door doesn’t close flush but that’s a small quibble on an otherwise excellent car. – Sold for $63,800 at Auctions America’s Ft. Lauderdale auction fourteen months ago and bought here very reasonably for its condition, sharp colors and with a little bit off the top for the transmission change. Its odometer shows only three more miles now than it did in Ft. Lauderdale, though, so the seller never even got to experience the pleasure of driving it. At the rice it brought here it should be driven, not displayed.

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Show Comments (6)

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  1. These numbers are filled with inaccuracies. I logged every sale of this auction according to mecums own website results. Total sales = $35,984,501 plus commission. Total pass thru entries = 1324. Total vehicles sold = 779. Percentage sold = 58.65%. Average sale price = $46,193.20. Mecums numbers, not mine.

  2. Michael,
    Wow! That’s a massive effort.
    The stats published in SCD are derived from a spreadsheet of final results received directly from Mecum the week after the sale.
    They are then cleaned of dupes and reruns (based on the VIN reported by Mecum) so the same car is counted only once even if it crosses the block twice. A rerun that is sold one time but passed another is included as sold; the no-sale is not included in the sale total but is noted in the individual transaction record’s Comments field. Lots reported sold twice (it does happen) are included only once, generally at the higher or the later of the two transaction amounts.
    Grouped transactions (boat and trailer, for instance, sold together but wiht two lot numbers) are counted only once.
    Mecum sometimes reports a lot with a “$0” transaction. In reviewing the sale and cleaning up the results these lots are not included.
    The SCD reports generally don’t include motorcycles or golf carts, although I may not find all of them. In the case of the Spring Classic most of the motorcycles ran May 14 under distinct lot numbers and those [approximately] $1,542,510 in total sales were not included. In general I have found these transactions to be no-shows, although in some cases they are no-sales where the auctioneer and clerk don’t record the high bid amount. They are in aggregate not significant.
    Reported results and totals include Mecum’s buyer’s premium of the greater of $500 or 8% of the hammer bids; Mecum reports only the hammer bids on the website (as you noted above) and in their spreadsheet, for both sold and no-sale lots.
    We give Mecum’s “Bid Goes On” staff credit for their work closing deals after the cars cross the block and up to five working days after the auction so lots that are passed on the block but closed later are included. We do the same for all other auctions, as do all of our colleagues in the collector car auction reporting world.
    I went back and checked my results and find that one more lot has appeared in the “Sold” column, bringing the total sold to 823 lots and elevating the sale total to just over $41 million ($41,016,823.)
    That’s how it works, and I’ll stand by the numbers in SCD, but commend you for taking the time and going to the trouble of compiling a massive list for your own information.

  3. I made a mistake in the earlier comment. It should read as follows:
    Michael,
    Wow! That’s a massive effort.
    The stats published in SCD are derived from a spreadsheet of final results received directly from Mecum the week after the sale.
    They are then cleaned of dupes and reruns (based on the VIN reported by Mecum) so the same car is counted only once even if it crosses the block twice. A rerun that is sold one time but passed another is included as sold; the no-sale is not included in the sale total but is noted in the individual transaction record’s Comments field. Lots reported sold twice (it does happen) are included only once, generally at the higher or the later of the two transaction amounts.
    Grouped transactions (boat and trailer, for instance, sold together but wiht two lot numbers) are counted only once.
    Mecum sometimes reports a lot with a “$0? transaction. In reviewing the sale and cleaning up the results these lots are not included. In general I have found these transactions to be no-shows, although in some cases they are no-sales where the auctioneer and clerk don’t record the high bid amount. They are in aggregate not significant.
    The SCD reports generally don’t include motorcycles or golf carts, although I may not find all of them. In the case of the Spring Classic most of the motorcycles ran May 14 under distinct lot numbers and those [approximately] $1,542,510 in total sales were not included.
    Reported results and totals include Mecum’s buyer’s premium of the greater of $500 or 8% of the hammer bids; Mecum reports only the hammer bids on the website (as you noted above) and in their spreadsheet, for both sold and no-sale lots.
    We give Mecum’s “Bid Goes On” staff credit for their work closing deals after the cars cross the block and up to five working days after the auction so lots that are passed on the block but closed later are included. We do the same for all other auctions, as do all of our colleagues in the collector car auction reporting world.
    I went back and checked my results and find that one more lot has appeared in the “Sold” column, bringing the total sold to 823 lots and elevating the sale total to just over $41 million ($41,016,823.)
    That’s how it works, and I’ll stand by the numbers in SCD, but commend you for taking the time and going to the trouble of compiling a massive list for your own information.