Meskowski Dirt Champ Car

An Insight into Exercising the Brumos Collection Vehicles

The Brumos Collection recently announced that it will reopen to the public on January 21, 2021. The internationally acclaimed collector car destination had its grand opening in January 2020, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it closed its doors to the public just two months afterward, in March 2020.

 A special feature of the Brumos Collection is that every car that you see is taken out and driven, keeping all cars in outstanding shape.

Cars at the Brumos Collection

To keep the cars in good working order each of the cars is taken out of the facility to get exercise in an attempt to prevent mechanical issues that arise by leaving them sitting idle for too long.

So what’s the process of getting each car of the Museum floor and exercising these iconic cars? Well, Brandon Starks, Executive Director of the Collection, and Don Leatherwood provide a short valuable insight into the process they take.

The featured car in the episode is a 1963 Meskowski Dirt Champ Car.
Taking cues from his employer Harry Miller, engine builder Fred Offenhauser powered his Sprint car by developing a dominant 4-cylinder motor. The Sprint car was named after Wally Msekowski, the legendary racer’s crew chief and engineer.

1963 Meskowski Dirt Champ Car
Photo by Peter Harholdt 

The dirt racer cemented its right in motorsports fame when driver A.J. Foyt, whose race car did not show up, decided to race it on the pavement in the Milwaukee Mile.


Two New Additions to the Museum

The reopening of the Brumos Collection will feature two latest additions to the display floor, being a 925 Bugatti Type 35 and a 1923 Locomobile Model 48 Series 8 Sportif. These two cars add to the many historically acclaimed race and collector cars the Museum features. 

1925 Bugatti Type 35  

The 1925 Bugatti Type 35 recently appeared in a Sports Car Digest article that looked into the restoration of this beautiful car.

1925 Bugatti Type 35

This historic racecar was held by Wallis Bird, Manhattan socialite and Standard Oil heir. After it was built it was only raced once against competitors of the like of the Duesenberg, Miller, and Alfa Romeos in the 1937 Automobile Racing Club of American Grand Prix.  

side of 1925 Bugatti Type 35

1923 Locomobile Model 48 Series 8 Sportif 

During the 1920s this car was recognised as “The Best Built Car in America.”

1923 Locomobile Model 48 Series 8 Sportif
Photo by Peter Harholdt 

The company Locomobile acquired a name for itself during the classical “Nickel & Chrome Era.” This unrestored car had the patina of tradition even when new. Locomobile specialized in handcrafted, overbuilt automobiles despite other manufacturers adopting the moving assembly, lightweight components, and model changes yearly. This automobile was driven for three decades by its first owner.

More information regarding visiting the Brumos Collection can be found on their website.