Mecum Indianapolis 2015 – Auction Report

Mecum Indianapolis 2015 – Auction Report Page Three

1959 Ford Galaxie Sunliner Convertible
Lot # F49 1959 Ford Galaxie Sunliner Convertible; S/N B9KC155882; Teal, White/Turquoise, White vinyl; White top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $38,880. With Reserve. 332/225hp, column-shift automatic, power steering, power brakes, power top, Continental kit, full wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bench seat. – The paint has many small scratches and touch ups. Panel fit is good. Engine bay looks good and original other than new wires, belts, and hoses. Underneath is showing a decent amount of road rash. Brightwork is good, but showing some age. Interior is original and showing some wear but overall good. A good cruiser made better with the convenience of the power top that came on the Sunliner, but this example is no better than a reasonably well maintained car and a driver. – Offered at Spring Auburn in 1993 in pretty much the same condition as it appeared here with a high bid of $13,000. Sold at Spring Auburn last year for $30,250. It was a good value at that price, but today brought full retail money.
1966 Ford Mustang Fastback
Lot # F53 1966 Ford Mustang Fastback; S/N 6R09C148126; Red/Black; Recent restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $35,640. With Reserve. 289/200hp upgraded with a 4-barrel, automatic, power steering, air conditioning, Rally wheels and gauges, narrow whitewalls, front disc brakes, radio. – Paint looks very good with next to no flaws. Brightwork looks new. Engine bay is well restored and not over done. Panel fit is slightly off. Undercarriage is very clean. Interior is very clean with minimal wear. A very good restoration that could be a show winner at least on the local level. – Offered at Kissimmee earlier this year with a reported high bid of $30,000, the result here in Indy is modest but not unreasonably inexpensive.
1967 Dodge Dart GT Convertible
Lot # F67 1967 Dodge Dart GT Convertible; S/N LP27D72328190; Red/Black vinyl; Black top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $23,500 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $25,380. With Reserve. 273/180hp, 4-speed, red line tires, wheel covers, dual mirrors, bucket seats, center console, radio. – Paint is decent with a lot of small scratches. Panel gaps are off a little. Brightwork is showing age and some small dings. Engine bay is clean with typical signs of use. Underneath looks to have been undercoated within the last few years. Interior is clean with some signs of use. 1 of 1,627 Convertibles with V8. An older restoration that is now a great driver with livable cosmetic flaws. – Chrysler made the Dart considerably bigger for 1967, making room for bigger engines in the process. This relatively early one has the small 273, though, and less desirable than some of the hotter Darts that came a bit later. The market for these has remained pretty flat, and this driver quality convertible brought an appropriate price, a little less than the $27,000 it sold for at Mecum’s Harrisburg sale ten months ago.
1957 Dodge D100 Sweptside Pickup
Lot # F100.1 1957 Dodge D100 Sweptside Pickup; S/N 84290404; Tropical Coral, White/Gray cloth; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $31,500 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $34,020. With Reserve. 315/204hp, pushbutton automatic, whitewalls, side-mounted spare wheel, wood bed sideboards. – A body-off truck restoration. Paint looks good with a few minor blemishes. Panel fit is great. Wood bed looks new and fantastic. Undercarriage looks very good with fresh undercoating. Engine bay is very clean showing minimal use and wear. Interior is very good with only slight wear. A high quality, showable truck in eye-catching colors. – The 1957 Dodge D100 is often overshadowed by the Fords and Chevys of the same era, but it possess great “Forward Look” style complete with tail fins. Prices for the Dodges are far superior, too, and this impressive number is actually a modest bargain that could have been $10K higher without being beyond reason. Hopefully it will inspire more like it to be restored.
1969 Ford Torino Cobra 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F126.1 1969 Ford Torino Cobra 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 9A46Q237551; Black/Gold vinyl with cloth inserts; Unrestored original, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $22,500 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $24,300. With Reserve. 428/335hp Cobra Jet, column-shift Cruise-O-Matic, air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, Goodyear Polyglas tires, bench seat, AM/FM radio. – Decent paint with a few scattered scratches. Dull, scratched and pitted brightwork throughout. The engine compartment is old and grungy. The undercarriage is dull with a partially replaced exhaust. The interior is old and dull as well. A mostly original car showing 91,827 miles. Its condition isn’t quite as bad as the mileage and the 46 years of age might suggest, but it is tired and in need of freshening up. – After getting a high bid of $22,000 here a year ago and a bid of $20,000 at Auburn Fall last September the seller had realistic expectations here, and the buyer was able to get a relatively rare 428 CJ-powered Torino for a price that leaves enough cash to put a serious dent into the car’s several cosmetic needs.
1972 Chevrolet C10 Fleetside Pickup
Lot # F129 1972 Chevrolet C10 Fleetside Pickup; S/N CCE142B132457; Black/White vinyl with Houndstooth inserts; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $18,900. No Reserve. 350/175hp, column-shift automatic, original wheel covers, Cooper tires, power steering, power brakes, driver’s side spotlight, wood veneer dash, radio. – Said to be all original with an older repaint. Showing 100,386 miles. Paint looks good overall but is a bit faded. Brightwork has seen better days and is fairly dull. Inside of the bed is very good. Engine has gotten paint, but the rest of the engine bay is original and shows age. Underneath shows well for an old truck with this many miles. Interior looks good with some wear. A pretty good C10 that hasn’t been overly pampered and you still wouldn’t mind using once in a while. – The final year of the second generation C10 is a fan favorite as this price attests. Yes, it is remarkably difficult to find a workhorse truck in solid original condition, but this amount is approximately twice would be expected for its age and condition.
1963 Ford Galaxie 500 Lightweight Fastback
Lot # F163 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 Lightweight Fastback; S/N 3N66R144813; White/Red vinyl; Older restoration, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $66,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $71,280. With Reserve. 427/425hp, race prepped by Rich Lamont, 4-speed, MSD ignition, 4.86 axle, hi-beam delete, fiberglass front end and trunk lid, aluminum bumpers, race exhaust, American Racing alloy wheels in the front, steel in back with slicks. Radio and heater delete. – Sponsored by Norristown Ford, driven by Larry Bloomer, Super Stock class winner for 10 consecutive weeks in 1963. The old paint is cracked and chipping away around the driver’s side rear wheel well. The brightwork is good. The engine compartment is dull from use and age, as is the undercarriage. The interior shows little evidence of use. A sound but ageing superficial old restoration, it is now a great basis for a straightforward, sympathetic restoration to as-raced condition or an ideal vintage drag car. – Ford Lightweights were like ants at a picnic in Indy: every building seemed to have one or two. Even with profligate supply, though, the demand was there and this is a realistic result considering the age and condition of the restoration. It deserves to be done anew, and at this price it can be.
1962 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop
Lot # F175 1962 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 962L3958; Light Blue/Blue vinyl; White top; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 8.00%; Final Price $23,760. With Reserve. 389/333hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, power windows, factory tach, fender skirts, 8-lug wheels, PHS documentation, Protect-O-Plate. – The paint has seen better days and has lots of scratches, chips, and fish eyes. Panels fit well, but have some small edge chips. Brightwork is very good. Underneath has some road rash. Engine bay looks correct and shows more signs of use. Interior has some wear as well and seats are slightly faded. A driver quality big cruiser, nothing more and nothing less. – Pontiac’s first Grand Prix in 1962 featured standard Pontiac bodywork cleaned of chrome embellishment with a bucket seat interior. It wasn’t the styling statement it would become in ’63, but it was still a statement, eschewing the glitz of the Harley Earl days for Bill Mitchell’s more subtle treatment. This is a competently presented if somewhat aged example, bought at an appropriate price.

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Show Comments (6)

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  1. These numbers are filled with inaccuracies. I logged every sale of this auction according to mecums own website results. Total sales = $35,984,501 plus commission. Total pass thru entries = 1324. Total vehicles sold = 779. Percentage sold = 58.65%. Average sale price = $46,193.20. Mecums numbers, not mine.

  2. Michael,
    Wow! That’s a massive effort.
    The stats published in SCD are derived from a spreadsheet of final results received directly from Mecum the week after the sale.
    They are then cleaned of dupes and reruns (based on the VIN reported by Mecum) so the same car is counted only once even if it crosses the block twice. A rerun that is sold one time but passed another is included as sold; the no-sale is not included in the sale total but is noted in the individual transaction record’s Comments field. Lots reported sold twice (it does happen) are included only once, generally at the higher or the later of the two transaction amounts.
    Grouped transactions (boat and trailer, for instance, sold together but wiht two lot numbers) are counted only once.
    Mecum sometimes reports a lot with a “$0” transaction. In reviewing the sale and cleaning up the results these lots are not included.
    The SCD reports generally don’t include motorcycles or golf carts, although I may not find all of them. In the case of the Spring Classic most of the motorcycles ran May 14 under distinct lot numbers and those [approximately] $1,542,510 in total sales were not included. In general I have found these transactions to be no-shows, although in some cases they are no-sales where the auctioneer and clerk don’t record the high bid amount. They are in aggregate not significant.
    Reported results and totals include Mecum’s buyer’s premium of the greater of $500 or 8% of the hammer bids; Mecum reports only the hammer bids on the website (as you noted above) and in their spreadsheet, for both sold and no-sale lots.
    We give Mecum’s “Bid Goes On” staff credit for their work closing deals after the cars cross the block and up to five working days after the auction so lots that are passed on the block but closed later are included. We do the same for all other auctions, as do all of our colleagues in the collector car auction reporting world.
    I went back and checked my results and find that one more lot has appeared in the “Sold” column, bringing the total sold to 823 lots and elevating the sale total to just over $41 million ($41,016,823.)
    That’s how it works, and I’ll stand by the numbers in SCD, but commend you for taking the time and going to the trouble of compiling a massive list for your own information.

  3. I made a mistake in the earlier comment. It should read as follows:
    Michael,
    Wow! That’s a massive effort.
    The stats published in SCD are derived from a spreadsheet of final results received directly from Mecum the week after the sale.
    They are then cleaned of dupes and reruns (based on the VIN reported by Mecum) so the same car is counted only once even if it crosses the block twice. A rerun that is sold one time but passed another is included as sold; the no-sale is not included in the sale total but is noted in the individual transaction record’s Comments field. Lots reported sold twice (it does happen) are included only once, generally at the higher or the later of the two transaction amounts.
    Grouped transactions (boat and trailer, for instance, sold together but wiht two lot numbers) are counted only once.
    Mecum sometimes reports a lot with a “$0? transaction. In reviewing the sale and cleaning up the results these lots are not included. In general I have found these transactions to be no-shows, although in some cases they are no-sales where the auctioneer and clerk don’t record the high bid amount. They are in aggregate not significant.
    The SCD reports generally don’t include motorcycles or golf carts, although I may not find all of them. In the case of the Spring Classic most of the motorcycles ran May 14 under distinct lot numbers and those [approximately] $1,542,510 in total sales were not included.
    Reported results and totals include Mecum’s buyer’s premium of the greater of $500 or 8% of the hammer bids; Mecum reports only the hammer bids on the website (as you noted above) and in their spreadsheet, for both sold and no-sale lots.
    We give Mecum’s “Bid Goes On” staff credit for their work closing deals after the cars cross the block and up to five working days after the auction so lots that are passed on the block but closed later are included. We do the same for all other auctions, as do all of our colleagues in the collector car auction reporting world.
    I went back and checked my results and find that one more lot has appeared in the “Sold” column, bringing the total sold to 823 lots and elevating the sale total to just over $41 million ($41,016,823.)
    That’s how it works, and I’ll stand by the numbers in SCD, but commend you for taking the time and going to the trouble of compiling a massive list for your own information.