1955 Jaguar D-Type Front
1955 Jaguar D-Type Front

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016 – Page Seven

RM Sotheby’s Hershey 2016 – Auction Report

1969 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster
Lot # 141 1969 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster; S/N 1R9535; Engine # 7R56469; Willow Green/Olive Green leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $60,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $64,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $70,400 – Chrome wire wheels, Dayton blackwall tires, AM-FM radio. – Dull but sound and largely chip free original paint. Very good original upholstery with surface cracked console pad. Engine compartment is original but clean and well maintained. A rare, highly original example that would be despoiled by restoration. – A lot of love and polish may very well restore the luster of the original paint on this XKE; the rest of it needs little more than careful maintenance and preservation and the bidders recognized both its quality and its preservation with this price, which could have been a bit higher and still not unreasonable.

Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas 2016 – Auction Report

1962 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster
Lot # 698 1962 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster; S/N 875679; Old English White/Tan leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000 – Centerlock wire wheels, black vinyl boot cover, woodrim steering wheel. – From the Tammy Allen collection. JDHT certificate. Represented as matching numbers, an early flat floor, welded louver E-Type. Driver’s door sticks out at the bottom. Chips behind the driver’s side window. Lightly but visibly worn seats. Paint doesn’t have the luster it used to. Tidy underneath. Restored well, but long before these things were worth quite so much and now deserving of better. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson in Los Angeles in 2002 for $48,600 in 2002 in essentially the same condition it is today, at WestWorld in 2003 for $56,700 and here in 2009 for $99,000. The early E-Types, despite their cramped footwells and back-breaking seats, are avidly sought and bring nearly fantastic prices. This example despite the age of its restoration brought well under what it could have without being expensive, an unusual Barrett-Jackson bargain from a featured collection.

Auctions America Hilton Head 2016 – Auction Report

1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster
Lot # 169 1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E11151; Engine # 7E4456-9; OE White/Tan leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $165,000 – $185,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $149,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $163,900 – Chrome wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, Blaupunkt multiband radio, JDHT certificate documented, JDHT certificate documented. – 37,880 miles from new. Excellent fresh paint, chrome, interior and top. Spotless engine compartment. New seatbelts. Crisp gauge faces. Freshly and attractively restored to showroom condition. – This has to be about as good as a SI 4.2 E-type gets, done to high standards and beautifully and accurately presented. This also has to be an appropriate price for it, even with the low miles (which have been effectively erased by the comprehensive restoration.)
1958 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster
Lot # 172 1958 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster; S/N T83181DN; Engine # VS1690-9; OE White/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $135,000 – $170,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $114,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $125,400 – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin X tires, dual outside mirrors, overdrive. VS1675-9 cylinder head, JDHT certificate documented. – Mediocre older repaint with small cracks at stress points. Good lightly creased upholstery. Road grime on the frame and suspension. The engine compartment is orderly but shows use and age; the cylinder head number is different from (but close to) the block number. A competent older cosmetic restoration that has been driven. – While this isn’t the best XK 150S out there the things that detract from its presentation also show that it can, and has been, driven some distance and may be concluded to be in decent running and driving condition. That’s something that most fresh restorations can’t boast and makes it a good value at this price.
1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster
Lot # 186 1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E12049; Engine # 7E11651-9; Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $145,000 – $165,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $127,500 – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin blackwall tires, grille guard. – Head and block numbers match. Good paint except for the right door which shows some orange peel. New top. Good chrome and older upholstery. Clean, mostly detailed engine compartment. An enthusiast’s car in presentable and drivable condition. – Sold by Auctions America in Ft. Lauderdale in 2012 for $51,7000, then by Worldwide in Houston in 2013 for $85,250, by Mecum in Houston in 2014 for $89,640 and by Mecum in Kissimmee in January of this year for $100,000. It’s been detailed and refreshed since then, but still doesn’t fit the definition of restored and the seller was deluded not to accept the high bid here or anything close to it, especially when the freshly restored (Lot # 169) SI 4.2 Roadster sold earlier went on a hammer bid only $21,500 more.

Mecum Dallas 2016 – Auction Report

1970 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster
Lot # S163 1970 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster; S/N 1R11868; Green/Beige leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $39,600 – Wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, Philips pushbutton radio, factory air conditioning. – Rebuilt original engine and new seat upholstery, but otherwise original, tired and dirty. Cracking, crazed paint. Dirty underneath. Worn switchgear. Not completely tired given the mechanical attention that it has received, but not an attractive car. – The new owner of this Series II XKE will almost immediately head for the body shop but being there runs the risk of falling into the pit of ‘while we’re at it’ and turning into an unproductive and financially challenging full restoration, even at this moderate acquisition cost.
1968 Jaguar XKE SI.5 Coupe 2+2
Lot # T133 1968 Jaguar XKE SI.5 Coupe 2+2; S/N 1E78821; Primrose Yellow/Black leather; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,850 – Centerlock wire wheels, Vredestein Sprint Classic tires, aftermarket ignition, woodrim steering wheel, Pioneer pushbutton radio. – Sound, lightly faded 1980s repaint. Wiper scratches on the windshield. Tidy but used engine bay. Lightly worn replacement upholstery, but the rest of the interior is original and fairly worn. Represented with recent mechanical and cosmetic restoration 1,000 miles ago, but that’s using the term restoration loosely. It’s a car that’s gotten intermittent restoration work and been recently gone over, but has never been thoroughly restored and today is a driver. – A driver bought for driver money, and a transaction both parties can be satisfied with.

[Source: Rick Carey lead photo: Patrick Ernzen / RM Sotheby’s]

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  1. These old Jags are beautiful cars, especially when restored and maintained by those who can afford them. My experience with Jag ownership was short and bittersweet. In 1976 I bought a ’67 XKE, yellow, with only 42K miles showing on the gauges. I discovered quickly the cost of driving a beast with way too many moving parts heating up the 9 quarts or so motor oil during the south Florida summer. I became very poor very quickly, but did enjoy some great driving moments in my Jag. The best was letting a Brit flyboy off the Ark Royal have a drive during Fort Lauderdale’s bicentennial celebration and blasting through the Kinney tunnel, top down and well lubricated, before the overheating 4.2 required a lengthy stoppage and visit to Norman of England to add another cooling fan. My Jag had three! Unfortunately, I had to get rid of the Jag because it clearly was not designed for urban use in the Tropics. It was not until 2007 did I find the car the old Jag should have been- a Honda S2000, the best affordable sports car ever built.