1955 Jaguar D-Type Front
1955 Jaguar D-Type Front

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016

The Jaguar brand made quite the statement in 2016 when RM Sotheby’s rattled the collector car world with the opportunity to publicly purchase arguably one of the most coveted racing cars of all time. The 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans-winning Ecurie Ecosse D-Type crossed the block during Monterey Car Week, selling for a staggering $21,780,000 when the gavel finally fell. That figure would not only make this heroic D-Type Jaguar the most expensive Jaguar ever sold at auction, but almost without contest, the most expensive British car to ever sell on the block.

Of course not every Jaguar sold at auction in 2016 was fraught with the kind of a legacy and provenance of chassis XKD-501. Auction Editor Rick Carey sought to peel back the many layers of the onion at collector car auctions and give readers a better idea of the quality of the felines that filled auction tents.

(See Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2015)
(See Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2014)

Listed in chronological order, Rick Carey’s reports on the 50 Jaguars analyzed in 2016.

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016

Mecum Kissimmee 2016 – Auction Report

1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Coupe
Lot # S4 1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Coupe; S/N 1E31875; Opalescent Silver Blue/Saddle leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200 – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, woodrim steering wheel, Becker Europa radio, JDHT certificate. – Same owner until 1999. Very good newer upholstery. The speedometer is stuck at 105 mph, but the odometer supposedly still works and shows 53,432 miles which are represented to be all it’s covered from new and are appropriate to its condition. Worn but clean engine bay, represented to be the original engine. Headlight bezels not flush. Small dent in the left rear fender. Cracked window molding. Good older repaint with masking errors at the top of the windshield. You wouldn’t be ashamed to be seen in it, but this is far from a show car. A mostly original car underneath with more recent basic cosmetic work. – A good buy, this car could have brought another 10 grand without being expensive.
1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Roadster
Lot # S38.1 1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Roadster; S/N UD1S21138; Black/Black leather; Black top; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,750 – 4-speed, chrome wire wheels, Michelin tires, power steering, power brakes, power windows, Pioneer CD stereo, leather-wrapped steering wheel, factory air conditioning, cruise control. – Sound, lightly used interior. Very clean underneath. Newer-looking exhaust. Very good paint. Straight bodywork. Restored 1,000 miles ago and showing 22,543 on the odometer. Tidy. Not a remarkable car, but not bad. A roadster with a 4-speed is arguably the V-12 E-Type to have, and this one has been well restored without being overdone. – Attractively equipped, and attractively priced for the new owner, too.

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale 2016 – Auction Report

1967 Jaguar Mark 2 3.8 4-Dr. Sedan
Lot # 0658 1967 Jaguar Mark 2 3.8 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N P1878927DN; Signal Red/Black leather; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – Centerlock wire wheels, Michelin X red line tires, dual mirrors, Moto-Lita woodrim steering wheel, wood dash and window trim, wood shift knob, later cassette stereo. – Wheel lobes are battered from being been hammered on. Overspray on passenger side door jambs. Lightly pitted window frames. Good newer repaint with cracking at the bottom of the nose. Good chrome. Small gouge in the refinished wood dash, otherwise very good refurbished interior. Crack in right taillight. Restored, but not exquisitely and it was never fully apart. – This car isn’t perfect, but it’s a great driver, and getting those classic feline Jaguar lines, a silky smooth XK straight-six and about a small forest’s worth of wood in the interior for less than 30 grand is a great buy. If you don’t count E-Types, classic Jags often make for an overall good value, and this was an even bigger bargain, bought for what was claimed to be the cost of the refurbishment and well under what this level of style, comfort, performance and handling could have been expected to bring.
1967 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster
Lot # 1151 1967 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E14718; Opalescent Silver Blue/Black leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $98,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $107,800 – Triple SU carbs, centerlock chrome wire wheels, Dunlop tires, woodrim steering wheel, wood dash. – Represented as matching numbers. Light orange peel throughout the paint. Some surface rust in the screws that hold in the headlight bezels. Excellent top. Excellent interior. Decent older chrome. Pretty and restored underneath. Restored by the long-term owner and completely gone through mechanically. An enthusiast job that was done relatively thoroughly, but missed big time on the paint. Restoration completed in 2015 and 700 miles ago. The standard for E-Type restorations, particularly SI 4.2 Roadsters, is a high one. This one, redone by the owner, fell short of professional quality, at least in terms of cosmetics, and it showed. – There wasn’t a shortage of E-Types in Scottsdale, and most Jag buyers were at the catalogue sales. This one was appropriately discounted for its cosmetic shortcomings and came at a price that was slightly favorable to the buyer.
1961 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster
Lot # 1368.1 1961 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster; S/N 875169; Gunmetal Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $400,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $440,000 – Chrome wire wheels, bias ply blackwall tires, outside bonnet latch, welded louver. – Freshly restored with excellent paint, chrome and interior. Show polished engine compartment, like new underbody and suspension. Cosmetics are better than new and fresh. – This is the XKE everyone wants, even though few people have feet small enough to operate the pedals safely in the constricted footwells and the seats are Geneva Convention violating instruments of torture after half an hour in them. But people still want them and they are egregiously expensive trophies, like this transaction.
1968 Jaguar XKE SI.5 Roadster
Lot # 1401 1968 Jaguar XKE SI.5 Roadster; S/N 1E17502; Old English White/Black leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – Chrome wire wheels, blackwall tires, no radio, adjustable seat backs, synchro gearbox. – Driver’s seat is lightly stretched, otherwise clean, fresh, sharp and better than new paint, chrome and interior. Engine is dusty and used. Wheelwells show some miles. A usable but not especially notable XKE. – Sold by RM in Monterey in 2000 for $31,900 freshly restored, then by Bonhams at Amelia last March for $89,100 and marching upward a notch here at WestWorld.
1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Roadster
Lot # 1402 1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Roadster; S/N UD1S21141; Maroon/Biscuit leather; Black leatherette top; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000 – Chrome wire wheels, blackwall tires, upgraded engine management system and 5-speed gearbox, cassette stereo, air conditioning. – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Underbody is like new. – Sold at Mecum Dallas in 2014 for $38,340 and gone through since then to its present bright, shiny condition. It could have brought over $100,000 without comment and represents a good value at this price, which discounts the modifications that make it a better, faster driver. So much for good intentions.

RM Sotheby’s Arizona 2016 – Auction Report

1960 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Drophead Coupe
Lot # 221 1960 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Drophead Coupe; S/N S838432DN; Engine # VA11119; Cotswold Blue/Biscuit leather piped in Blue; Dark Blue Cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000. – 5-speed gearbox (original Moss overdrive 4-speed included), centerlock wire wheels, Firestone blackwall tires, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, locking filler cap. – Represented as matching numbers cylinder block and head, documented on the JDHT Certificate. Door gaps are slightly uneven. Paint crack on the right rear fender. Good, shiny paint otherwise. Very good top. Cracked steering wheel center cap. Dirty, discolored but sound seats and carpets. Restored a while ago by Jaguar specialists and driven regularly since. It’s a good 20 foot car, but it’s used and won’t take home any JCNA trophies. – This is XK 150S money, and this isn’t an XK 150S.

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  1. These old Jags are beautiful cars, especially when restored and maintained by those who can afford them. My experience with Jag ownership was short and bittersweet. In 1976 I bought a ’67 XKE, yellow, with only 42K miles showing on the gauges. I discovered quickly the cost of driving a beast with way too many moving parts heating up the 9 quarts or so motor oil during the south Florida summer. I became very poor very quickly, but did enjoy some great driving moments in my Jag. The best was letting a Brit flyboy off the Ark Royal have a drive during Fort Lauderdale’s bicentennial celebration and blasting through the Kinney tunnel, top down and well lubricated, before the overheating 4.2 required a lengthy stoppage and visit to Norman of England to add another cooling fan. My Jag had three! Unfortunately, I had to get rid of the Jag because it clearly was not designed for urban use in the Tropics. It was not until 2007 did I find the car the old Jag should have been- a Honda S2000, the best affordable sports car ever built.