1955 Jaguar D-Type Front
1955 Jaguar D-Type Front

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016

Jaguars Sold at Auction in 2016 – Page Five

Barrett-Jackson Northeast 2016 – Auction Report

1995 Jaguar XJ-S Coupe
Lot # 595 1995 Jaguar XJ-S Coupe; S/N SAJNX5343SC199111; Blue/Cream leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $12,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,200. No Reserve. – V-12, automatic, alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, rear spoiler, power windows, air conditioning, digital stereo, wood dash and shift knob, heated seats, CD changer stereo. – Some light chips on the nose and some light swirl scratches on the roof. Otherwise quite good original paint. Fairly worn seats that correspond with the 59,284 miles on the odometer. Clean underneath. Nothing more than a used car, but a well kept one. – The most expensive of the four XJS Coupes in the sale, and it deserved to be. It’s a lot of car and a lot of luxury for the money, but this is an appropriate price and with a Jag V-12 under the hood, it’s potentially a lot of trips to the shop as well.

RM Sotheby’s Monterey 2016 – Auction Report

1955 Jaguar D-Type Sports Racer
Lot # 114 1955 Jaguar D-Type Sports Racer; S/N XKD501; Engine # E2036-9; Ecosse Blue/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $20,000,000 – $25,000,000; Competition restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,800,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,780,000 – RHD. Dunlop centerlock alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, wraparound windscreen, transparent soft cover over the passenger’s seat, driver’s head fairing and fin, left side exhaust. – ’56 Ecurie Ecosse Le Mans winner driven by Sanderson and Flockhart, the first D-type for private sale. Engine from XKD561. Raced by Ecurie Ecosse through 1957 with three subsequent owners, restored in the 70’s and vintage raced and displayed since. Decent paint, worn original upholstery, chipguarded nose. Aged and honest. – Sold by Christie’s in London in 1999 for GBP 1,706,500 ($2,810,627 at the time and $2.2 million at today’s exchange rate), freshened but not re-restored since and impressively preserved in exceptionally usable condition and original 1956 Le Mans configuration. This is the most expensive British automobile ever sold at auction, and it deserves to be.
1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster
Lot # 122 1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E10520; Engine # 7E24459; Opalescent Dark Green, Opalescent Dark Green hardtop/Suede Green leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $253,000 – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Michelin Defender tires, hardtop and soft top, woodrim steering wheel, 3.23 gears, modern radiator. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Spotless underneath. Completely done to high standards a while ago and carefully maintained since. Doors don’t quite fit flush with the body, but it’s barely noticeable. – With an outstanding restoration and distinctive but subtle colors this is a particularly appealing XKE that measures up to the price it brought.
1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadste
Lot # 135 1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster; S/N 670132; Engine # W12708; Black/Brown, Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $400,000 – $475,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $385,000 – Hub caps and trim rings, Dunlop Road Speed tires, fender skirts, Lucas driving lights. – Represented as matching numbers. Older bumper chrome. Very good paint. Passenger’s side door doesn’t quite fit flush with the body. Very clean restored underbody. Small paint run at the very top of the driver’s side door. Restored about 25 years ago but the work looks like it was done much more recently. Not perfect, but very good. One of 184 alloy cars built in left-hand drive and 242 total. – Sold for $418,000 at Dragone Hershey 2014. This result was more appropriate for the age of its restoration. It may be a tough pill to swallow for the owner of just two years, but he had no misconceptions of value and let the car go at an appropriate offer.
1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe
Lot # 218 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220857; Engine # 6A10086SB; Silver/Gray leather; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $345,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $379,500 – Michelin Pilot Sport tires, Alpine cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Two-inch-long, deep scratch right next to the radio antenna. Wheel nuts have marks from being taken off. Tiny scratch on the bottom of the front lip. Engine bay is very clean but looks run. Like new interior. Imported to the U.S. from Japan in 2003. Small flaws are forgivable and it shows 12,710 miles, although the CARFAX reports odometer discrepancies. – Sold for above RM’s high estimate, but considering the XJ220’s wild styling, 217-mph performance and rarity, these cars are still relatively underappreciated compared to the other 1990s supercars and are a serious value as a result. XJ 220s are only just beginning to overcome the debacle of their introduction where buyers placed orders for what they thought would be a 12-cylinder supercar but were finally offered a twin turbo V6 at a time when the collector car market was in the tank. Six-figure deposits were forfeited en masse.
1938 SS Jaguar 100 Roadster
Lot # 246 1938 SS Jaguar 100 Roadster; S/N 49049; Engine # T9528; Gunmetal Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $572,000 – RHD. Body color wire wheels, Dunlop blackwall tires, radiator and headlight stoneguards, originally 2 1/2 liter but now 3 1/2 liters. – Excellent paint, chrome, top and interior. Freshly restored to better than showroom condition. – Sold by Bonhams at Greenwich last year for $215,000 in partially restored condition, freshly completed by Classic Showcase. It is a good value for the money at this price. The engine swap makes for a much improved driving experience and hardly affects the value.

Bonhams Quail Lodge 2016 – Auction Report

1949 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster Alloy
Lot # 42 1949 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster Alloy; S/N 670056; Engine # W1108-8; Silver/Red leather; Estimate $380,000 – $480,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $360,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $396,000 – Alloy bodywork, hub caps, Avon tires, fender skirts, Lucas driving lights, JDHT certificate. – Represented as matching numbers. Very good chrome. Excellent, gorgeous paint. Light pitting on the windshield frame. Very clean and restored underneath. A fantastic car. Restored 10 years ago, but the quality of work is certainly holding up and any small flaws are easily forgiven considering the overall presentation and the kind of car that it is. One of just 240 alloy-bodies 120s and just 184 left-hand drive examples. – Sold at Christie’s Retromobile sale in 2006 for $235,918 following a restoration in France. The market for rare Jaguars has grown considerably since then and this example has since received a top notch concours-quality restoration. It got every bit what it deserved, which is well over twice what a standard XK 120 in similar condition could expect to bring.
1967 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster
Lot # 74 ; S/N 1E14600; Engine # 7E52408; Opalescent Golden Sand/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $290,000 – $320,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000 – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, hardtop, 3.07 differential, modern radiator and electric fan, documented with JDHT Certificate and original sales invoice. – Engine bay is very clean and restored. Cylinder head is original to the car, but the block is not. Headlight bezels don’t quite fit flush. Restored in factory livery in 2015. Excellent paint. Very good chrome. Excellent top. Interior looks new. Delivered new to Diana Ross (yes, that Diana Ross), as indicated by a small plaque on the transmission tunnel and documents that come with the car. – It’s hard to keep track of the rapid escalation of XKE prices, particularly for the highly desirable Series I with 4.2 liter engine and synchromesh transmission. Even taking the replacement block into account this is still a very reasonable price.

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  1. These old Jags are beautiful cars, especially when restored and maintained by those who can afford them. My experience with Jag ownership was short and bittersweet. In 1976 I bought a ’67 XKE, yellow, with only 42K miles showing on the gauges. I discovered quickly the cost of driving a beast with way too many moving parts heating up the 9 quarts or so motor oil during the south Florida summer. I became very poor very quickly, but did enjoy some great driving moments in my Jag. The best was letting a Brit flyboy off the Ark Royal have a drive during Fort Lauderdale’s bicentennial celebration and blasting through the Kinney tunnel, top down and well lubricated, before the overheating 4.2 required a lengthy stoppage and visit to Norman of England to add another cooling fan. My Jag had three! Unfortunately, I had to get rid of the Jag because it clearly was not designed for urban use in the Tropics. It was not until 2007 did I find the car the old Jag should have been- a Honda S2000, the best affordable sports car ever built.