RM Sotheby’s Hershey 2015 – Auction Report

RM Sotheby’s Hershey 2015 – Auction Report Page Three

1914 Rolls-Royce 40/50 HP Silver Ghost Landaulette, Body by Barker
Lot # 162 1914 Rolls-Royce 40/50 HP Silver Ghost Landaulette, Body by Barker; S/N 25EB; Engine # 89M; Cream/Tan leather; Beige broadcloth; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 1 condition; Hammered Sold at $525,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $577,500. With Reserve. RHD. Jump seats, sliding divider, Bleriot opera lamps, CAV head and side lights, dual sidemounts. – Excellent older paint, interior and combination of nickel and chrome. A very high quality restoration of an elegant and luxurious car. This is the original body but for many years it was treated as a limousine. Richard Solove discovered that it was in fact built by Barker as a Landaulette and it was restored that way. The restoration is beginning to show some age but is still highly elegant and imposing. – Sold for $134,500 in Sotheby’s auction of Ben Moser’s collection in 1993, then for $240,512 after being restored in England in Coys June 2003 London sale. An intriguing story of automotive sleuthing, with a satisfying result in uncovering and restoring the original folding landaulette roof, helps the value of this car. It was sold at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction along with several other Silver Ghosts from the Solove collection in 2007 for the generous sum of $1,155,000, then sold by RM in Arizona in 2012 for a more realistic $550,000. It is a storied Rolls-Royce with a magnificent restoration, still in show quality condition, holding its value well.
1911 Stanley Model 63 Toy Tonneau
Lot # 164 1911 Stanley Model 63 Toy Tonneau; S/N 6210; Red, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $140,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,500. No Reserve. 10hp double-acting steam engine. Rushmore acetylene headlights, E&J kerosene sidelights and taillight, Prest-o-Lite tank and boiler igniter, Rubes style bulb horn, Yellow chassis and wood spoke wheels, Neverout kerosene trouble light on steering column. – Reproduction body. Very good paint, upholstery and top, brilliant brass but some dull nickel. A show quality restoration completed in 2011 that looks a little older than that. – A quality car that embodies all the intriguing aspects of steam power, including the fascinating choreography of shafts, rods, bellcranks and valves that controls its operation. Rarely seen, and in excellent condition, it is a sound value at this price.
1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Convertible Coupe
Lot # 166 1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Convertible Coupe; S/N CG3617; Engine # CG3617; Tonawanda Green, Abbott Gray (Light Olive) fenders and accent/Beige leather; Heather cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $192,500. No Reserve. Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Trippe lights, radiator stoneguard, rumble seat. – Failing old paint especially on the cowl where it is chipping off. Chassis is oily and dirty. Good upholstery and top. Fair chrome. A usable but marginal tour car. – The estimate range might be the value of this Chrysler when the age of its restoration is remedied but the price it brought is its value in its present aged and used condition. Fortunately that leaves room for the new owner to make it the car is could (and should) be.
1933 Pierce-Arrow Twelve Convertible Coupe Roadster
Lot # 167 1933 Pierce-Arrow Twelve Convertible Coupe Roadster; S/N 3100014; Engine # 355018; Black/Saddle leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $290,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $319,000. With Reserve. Cream wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, cloth covered luggage trunk, rumble seat, Trippe lights, ride control, freewheeling. – First owned by banker George F. Tyler, later by a series of collectors, 27,264 miles from new, one of three that survive. Sound but aged paint, good interior and top. Rust pitted side window moldings. Serious gas tank leak. Paint cracks by windshield posts. Chassis is oily and a little grimy. Never restored and showing its age but more than good enough to be toured with pride. – It is highly unusual to find an automobile of this quality in any circumstances, but even more rare to find one that has survived 82 years with so few miles and in such consistent original condition. It needs help, but its needs are acknowledged by the price it brought and largely offset by the sleek design and V12 performance.
1947 Chrysler Town and Country 4-Dr. Sedan
Lot # 168 1947 Chrysler Town and Country 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 71002156; Sumac Red/Dark Red leather, Beige cloth; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 1 condition; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. With Reserve. Fluid Drive, dual remote spotlights, roof rack, fog lights, hubcaps, sombrero trim rings, wide whitewalls, windshield sun visor, pushbutton radio, backup lights, turn signals. – 2008 National First Prize, recently restored to better than new condition, 2015 Amelia Island class winner along with a string of other awards. Gorgeous paint, chrome, upholstery and (original) wood. – Having made its mark in the car show world it’s time for this magnificent T&C to move on, and it did, at a price that is probably less than what was spent on its gorgeous restoration, but accurately reflects its value.
1956 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible
Lot # 174 1956 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N E56S002253; Engine # 07437937F56GR; Onyx Black, Silver coves/Red vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $50,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. No Reserve. 265/225hp, 3-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, cassette stereo. – Sound older paint, chrome, and interior. Orderly but not fresh engine compartment and underbody. Restored to near showroom condition a while ago, then driven. – Bought appropriately for the equipment and quality of the restoration, as well as the added confidence that some post-restoration miles gives that operation has been shaken down and issues resolved.
1948 Allard L-Type 4-Seater
Lot # 175 1948 Allard L-Type 4-Seater; S/N L743; Burgundy/Grey leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,250. No Reserve. RHD. 85hp flathead V8, Bluemels Brooklands banjo spoke steering wheel, hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, enclosed rear spare, Lucas fog lights, folding windshield. – Good paint, chrome and interior. Underbody and engine are aged and largely original but clean and orderly, a mediocre but usable Allard. – Sold by Mecum in Monterey in 2013 for $47,080, no-saled by Auctions America in Ft. Lauderdale in 2014 at a reported $40,000. Bonhams had a restoration project L-Type at its Simeone Museum sale on Monday which sold for $51,700; only $550 more for a car that actually works, can be driven and stops seems much the more wise choice.
1941 Cadillac Series 62 Fastback
Lot # 219 1941 Cadillac Series 62 Fastback; S/N; Engine # 5344883; Oceano Blue, Crystal Blue roof/Grey broadcloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $42,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,750. No Reserve. 3-speed, heater, turn signals, fender skirts, hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, bumper overriders. – An original car with good original paint with some chips and scratches. Stone chipped hood. Good chrome and interior. Underbody is original, dirty and surface rusted. Engine compartment is orderly, dusty and aged. Represented to be 12,976 miles from new. Jim Miller estate. – Really extraordinary, not only for its survival but even more for its survival in such exceptional condition. It looks for all the world like an older cosmetic restoration with subsequent tour miles on it. The Hershey bidders were the best possible audience for it, understanding its exceptionality and willing to pay to get it even though Hershey is known for the parsimony of its habitués.