Ferrari Leggenda e Passione Auction Results – RM Auctions

RM Auctions, in association with Sotheby’s, held its 2009 Ferrari Leggenda e Passione auction on May 17th at Ferrari S.p.A. in Maranello, Italy. RM achieved yet another world record result when the 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa sold for $12,402,500.

RM Auctions’ 3rd annual auction is the only auction dedicated to the Ferrari marque, held within the Maranello factory grounds and endorsed by the Ferrari factory.

The 2009 Ferrari Leggenda e Passione event featured three Maseratis and 33 road and racing Ferraris, headlined by the 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa, 1967 Ferrari 330 P4, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California and a 1956 Maserati 250F Grand Prix Car. As in years past, all cars offered were certified by Ferrari Classiche.

Top sale went to the 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa at $12,402,500, followed by the 1956 Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France at $3,176,250, 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder at $2,911,563, and the 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB at $1,096,563. The other featured cars – 1967 Ferrari 330 P4, 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder and 1956 Maserati 250F Grand Prix Car – did not meet their required reserves.

RM Auctions offered 36 automobiles for sale, with 27 finding a new owner, reflecting a 75% sales rate. Total sales volume was $28,430,875 and the average price per car sold was $1,052,995.

Click here for complete auction results or visit www.rmauctions.com.

2009 Ferrari Leggenda e Passione Results:

1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa – Sold for $12,402,500 versus unavailable estimate. </strong>Chassis # 0714TR was extensively raced in period and was offered at auction for the first time. Painted in its period race-correct black livery and red nose.   Sale established a new world record price for the most expensive car ever to be sold at auction. Despite the record price, it was a fairly orderly sale as a phone bidder and an Italian bidder in the room slowly but surely made their way to the end result with the phone bidder taking the prize. While the price paid is significant (and then some), so is the Testa Rossa.
1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa – Sold for $12,402,500 versus unavailable estimate. Chassis # 0714TR was extensively raced in period and was offered at auction for the first time. Painted in its period race-correct black livery and red nose.

Sale established a new world record price for the most expensive car ever to be sold at auction. Despite the record price, it was a fairly orderly sale as a phone bidder and an Italian bidder in the room slowly but surely made their way to the end result with the phone bidder taking the prize. While the price paid is significant (and then some), so is the Testa Rossa.

<strong>1967 Ferrari 330 P4 – Did not sell at high bid of $7,400,000 versus unavailable estimate. </strong>Driven by Jackie Stewart and Chris Amon to 3rd place finish at 1967 24 Hours of Le Mans; also won the 1000km of Monza. Converted into Ferrari 350 Can-Am form late in 1967 and currently presented in same bodywork; offered for the first time in 38 years.
1967 Ferrari 330 P4 – Did not sell at high bid of $9,968,750 versus unavailable estimate. Driven by Jackie Stewart and Chris Amon to 3rd place finish at 1967 24 Hours of Le Mans; also won the 1000km of Monza. Converted into Ferrari 350 Can-Am form late in 1967 and currently presented in same bodywork; offered for the first time in 38 years.

This no-sale was drama of the highest order as Rob Myers of RM maneuvered back and forth between the seller and a potential buyer - a prominent American collector - trying his best to get one of them to budge or meet in the middle. While this negotiation process took minutes, it felt like hours and with each passing minute the tension ratcheted up a notch. It's a shame it did not trade at this price, although it was very entertaining to watch it unfold.

<strong>1956 Maserati 250F Grand Prix Car – Did not sell at high bid of $2,041,600 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,300,000 – $2,900,000; Chassis number 2526 was driven to victory at the 1956 Monaco Grand Prix by Stirling Moss.
1956 Maserati 250F Grand Prix Car – Did not sell at high bid of $2,041,600 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,300,000 – $2,900,000. Chassis number 2526 was driven to victory at the 1956 Monaco Grand Prix by Stirling Moss.
<strong>1959 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale Bertone – Estimate €2,200,000 – €2,900,000. </strong>One of two 250 GT SWB Ferraris bodied by Carrozzeria Bertone.
1959 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale Bertone – Did not sell at high bid of $2,200,000 versus pre-sale estimate of $3,000,000 – $4,000,000. One of two 250 GT SWB Ferraris bodied by Carrozzeria Bertone.
1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder – Estimate $5,800,000 – $7,400,000; One of 37 SWB covered headlight California Spyders.
1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder – Did not sell at high bid of $5,500,000 versus pre-sale estimate of $5,800,000 – $7,400,000. One of 37 SWB covered headlight California Spyders.
1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder – Estimate $2,800,000 – $3,400,000; Chassis # 1487 GT, an original covered-headlight example, enjoyed an active racing career, driven by Pierre Mion at Cumberland, Bridgehampton, Lime Rock and finishing 2nd overall at the 1960 six-hour race at Marlboro. The car was subsequently sold by Luigi Chinetti to the Rodriguez family in Mexico; Pedro drove 1487 GT to a class victory at the 1961 Gran Premio Indipendenza in Mexico.
1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder – Sold for $2,911,563 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,800,000 – $3,400,000. Chassis # 1487 GT, an original covered-headlight example, enjoyed an active racing career, driven by Pierre Mion at Cumberland, Bridgehampton, Lime Rock and finishing 2nd overall at the 1960 six-hour race at Marlboro. The car was subsequently sold by Luigi Chinetti to the Rodriguez family in Mexico; Pedro drove 1487 GT to a class victory at the 1961 Gran Premio Indipendenza in Mexico.
<strong>1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Tour de France – Estimate €2,750,000 – €3,250,000. </strong>Chassis # 0563 GT is the last of the series of eight cars produced in this body style. With its strong competition history, it would be eligible for the Tour Auto, Mille Miglia Storica and Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge. Last seen at RM's Monterey sale last August, where it failed to sell at high bid of $3,900,000 USD.
1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Tour de France – Sold for $3,176,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $3,700,000 - $4,400,000. Chassis # 0563 GT is the last of the series of eight cars produced in this body style. With its strong competition history, it would be eligible for the Tour Auto, Mille Miglia Storica and Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge.

Last seen at RM's Monterey sale last August, where it failed to sell at high bid of $3,900,000. In percentage terms, the drop in price is comparable to other markets.

<strong>1965 Ferrari 275 GTB/C – Did not sell at high bid of $1,718,750 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,400,000 – $3,000,000.</strong> One of the second series of ten Competizione Clienti cars built and one of just three right-hand drive examples. Previous owners include Maranello Concessionaires, Paddy McNally, Alan Mann and Frank Gardner. Offered for first time in more than 25 years.
1965 Ferrari 275 GTB/C – Did not sell at high bid of $1,718,750 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,400,000 – $3,000,000. One of the second series of ten Competizione Clienti cars built and one of just three right-hand drive examples. Previous owners include Maranello Concessionaires, Paddy McNally, Alan Mann and Frank Gardner. Offered for first time in more than 25 years.
<strong>1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy - Sold for $1,096,563 versus pre-sale estimate of $1,100,000 - $1,300,000.</strong>
1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy - Sold for $1,096,563 versus pre-sale estimate of $1,100,000 - $1,300,000.
<strong>1964 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Lusso Competizione – Estimate €800,000 – €1,100,000. </strong>Chassis # 5367 GT is one of only three competition Lussos and, given its participation in the Tour de France (5th in class 1964), race history and current competitiveness in vintage racing, may very well be the best.
1964 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Lusso Competizione – Did not sell at high bid of $796,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $1,100,000 – $1,500,000. Chassis # 5367 GT is one of only three competition Lussos; 5th in class at 1964 Tour de France.
<strong>1973 Ferrari 365 GTB 4 Competizione – Did not sell at high bid of $2,887,500 versus pre-sale estimate of $3,300,000 - $4,000,000. </strong>Chassis # 16363 was the second of the Series III factory competition (12 of 15 total) 365 GTB/4s built. Vic Elford and Claude Ballot-Léna drove 16363 to first in class and sixth overall at the 1975 24 Hours of Le Mans. Currently ready to race in original Thomson livery, 16363 is one of the few competition Daytonas to retain all of its original components, including the gearbox and engine.
1973 Ferrari 365 GTB 4 Competizione – Did not sell at high bid of $2,887,500 versus pre-sale estimate of $3,300,000 - $4,000,000. Chassis # 16363 was the second of the Series III factory competition (12 of 15 total) 365 GTB/4s built. Vic Elford and Claude Ballot-Léna drove 16363 to first in class and sixth overall at the 1975 24 Hours of Le Mans. Currently ready to race in original Thomson livery, 16363 is one of the few competition Daytonas to retain all of its original components, including the gearbox and engine.
<strong>1971 Ferrari 365 GTB 4 Spyder – Estimate €880,000 - €1,100,000.</strong> Never titled at any point in its unbroken ownership history, Chassis # 14543 is one of the lowest-mileage, most original and unique Daytona Spyders in existence.
1971 Ferrari 365 GTB 4 Spyder – Did not sell at high bid of $1,031,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $1,200,000 - $1,500,000. Never titled at any point in its unbroken ownership history, Chassis # 14543 is one of the lowest-mileage, most original and unique Daytona Spyders in existence. While a great story, many wondered what they would do with it considering it didn't make sense to title or drive it. The white with red stripe didn't help its cause either.
<strong>1957 Maserati 250S – Did not sell at high bid of $1,856,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,000,000 - $2,300,000. </strong>Chassis # 2431 is the first official factory Tipo 250S built, delivered new to the Texas dealership Hall & Shelby of Carroll Shelby and Dick Hall, brother of future Chaparral founder, Jim Hall. Raced successfully in period by Shelby and Jim Hall.
1957 Maserati 250S – Did not sell at high bid of $1,856,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $2,000,000 - $2,300,000. Chassis # 2431 is the first official factory Tipo 250S built, delivered new to the Texas dealership Hall & Shelby of Carroll Shelby and Dick Hall, brother of future Chaparral founder, Jim Hall. Raced successfully in period by Shelby and Jim Hall.
<strong>1990 Ferrari 641/2 Formula One Race Car – Estimate €300,000 - €400,000.</strong> Chassis # 121 was driving to victory at the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix by Alain Prost, plus two 3rd place and two 2nd place finishes throughout the season.
1990 Ferrari 641/2 Formula One Race Car – Sold for $393,250 versus pre-sale estimate of $400,000 - $540,000. Chassis # 121 was driving to victory at the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix by Alain Prost, plus two 3rd place and two 2nd place finishes throughout the season.
<strong>1985 Ferrari 288 GTO – Estimate €380,000 - €450,000.</strong>
1985 Ferrari 288 GTO – Sold for $529,375 versus pre-sale estimate of $510,000 - $610,000.

[Source: RM Auctions]

Show Comments (10)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Excellent report and photos. However, the converted Can-Am Ferrari 330 P4 mentioned was only ever driven by Jackie Stewart at the 1967 BOAC 500 held at Brands Hatch. He co-drove the car (in its original Spyder configuration) with Chris Amon to a second place finish behind the winning Phil Hill/Mike Spence driven Chaparral 2F.

  2. Thanks! Well, almost right I guess. Jackie Stewart’s one and only drive in a Ferrari P4 was indeed at Brands Hatch for the 1967 BOAC 500 – but obviously not in the chassis mentioned in the above report or my comments. Nonetheless, it is a shame that the factory converted some endurance P4s for the Can-Am series. I wonder if the next owner will be tempted to return the Can-Am car back to its original endurance configuration? By the way, Anthony Pritchard’s Scarlet Passion book has some excellent photos of P4s racing in the 1967 Can-Am series!

  3. Great timely report and photos. Nice to see you guys were out at the auction. Keep up the good work.

  4. “Nonetheless, it is a shame that the factory converted some endurance P4s for the Can-Am series. I wonder if the next owner will be tempted to return the Can-Am car back to its original endurance configuration?”

    For a lively discussion on this topic (342 posts last I looked), go to the Vintage section of Ferrarichat.com and follow the “0858 to be auctioned” thread…

    Cheers

  5. The ferrarichat.com thread makes interesting reading. I concur with the gent on the forum who suggested that as the Can-Am P4 is currently exactly how it left the factory in 1967, it should remain in that configuration!

  6. please it is possible to have photos and technical documentation on Ferrari 641/2 speciallyon the ecu of engine and gear box and telemetri,electric system,battery,accelerator pedal ecc regards Nicola Melluso