Ferrari 312 PB driven by Clay Regazzoni and Brian Redman finished 4th at the 1972 Daytona 6-Hours (photo: Autosports Marketing Assoc.)
Ferrari 312 PB driven by Clay Regazzoni and Brian Redman finished 4th at the 1972 Daytona 6-Hours (photo: Autosports Marketing Assoc.)

Photo History of Ferrari Racing at Daytona

Pedro Rodriguez and Mario Andretti finished 4th in 1966 in a NART Ferrari 365 P2/3 as the Daytona race is expanded to 24 Hours (photo: Ferrari)
Pedro Rodriguez and Mario Andretti finished 4th in 1966 in a NART Ferrari 365 P2/3 as the Daytona race is expanded to 24 Hours (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) and Ferrari 412 P (0844) at Daytona in 1967 (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) and Ferrari 412 P (0844) at Daytona in 1967 (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)

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Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)
Ferrari 330 P3/4 (0846) driven by Lorenzo Bandini and Chris Amon (photo: Ferrari)
1-2-3 Ferrari finish at the 1967 Daytona 24 Hours (photo: Ferrari)
1-2-3 Ferrari finish at the 1967 Daytona 24 Hours (photo: Ferrari)

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Show Comments (14)

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  1. What the ?!?! I knew about the famous 1-2-3 finish at Daytona, but never heard about the insanity of racing at 375 Indy on the sands at Daytona. Fabulous is right!

  2. Great photos, I saw most of those races. But how about the 64 GTO/LM , it won the 2000km in 64 with Hill & Rodreguez and the 330P2 driven by Surtees & Rodreguez in 65. Beautiful Ferraris.

  3. I was with the “Hollywood” team of Newman et al in 1977. They had such fun that they came back the next year and finished second overall, and this in a six year old car that was the owner’s daily driver! Had they protested the winner for pushing their car over the finish line they could have been the overall winner.

  4. Great photos as always. Wish there had been more of the earlier races. My love of endurance racing was created by the early 60’s Ferrari teams and the shark nose race cars.
    Looking at drivers listed is interesting as it was the days of racing both sport cars and F1.

  5. Fabulous evocative pictures! How tough must it have been racing open cars in the early 70’s on that surface- the shot blasted noses and fender panels on those beautiful bodies is almost unthinkable these days, just as well the pit crews had plenty of duct tape handy!

  6. Regarding the winning Ferrari 250GTO of the 3 hours of Daytona in 1963…are you certain the serial number was 4219? From 1979 to 2004 I owned 250GT4217, the car off the assembly line one car ahead of 4219. One day in the early 1980s I brought my car (a 250 2+2) in to Modena Motors in Redwood City for some work. Sitting outside was a dark blue Ferrari 250GTO. The car had number lights on the door (and perhaps the rear deck…don’t recall), and out of curiosity I wondered about the serial number. The shop owner, Bill Morton, opened the glove box and we looked at the serial number, and it was 4219…the next car off the line from my car. However, Bill said the GTO had been owned by (George?) Dwyer (spelling?) in Hillsborough since new and though built with endurance racing in mind, the car had never been raced. So either Bill was somehow mistaken, or Ferrari has supplied the incorrect serial number for the Daytona winning car (a not so unusual situation for the factory in regards to records even in the 60s).

    1. Hello Marty. S/N 4219 is correct. Entered for the 1963 Daytona 3 hour race by Chinetti, won by Pedro Rodriguez in this car. Sold later (63/64) to Bev Spencer, Buick dealer in San Francisco, then on to George Dyer of Hillsborough, who owned this very original 250 GTO (due to limited racing history, lack of major incidents etc) for many years. Currently resides in the UK, as part of the major Ferrari collection owned by BW. Albeit current value is $50M+, BW drives the car frequently; I happened to be at Maranello in May 2017 when the car arrived at the Ferrari museum, soaking wet and dirty, due to participate in the 55 year anniversary 250 GTO celebrations. The crowd within the museum instantly went to the side door where the car was admitted, leaving behind viewing any number of important Ferraris, to have a look at this splendid car. Such is the importance of the 250 GTO in Ferrari lore.

      1. Thanks for the update. I only saw the car that one time, and it was in “like new” condition. I found the coincidence of the build sequence relative to my 2+2 amusing but was aware that, as a “production” model GT Ferrari gave the GTO IDs ending in odd numbers and did not paint the heads red, in order to differentiate them from “racing” models. And it appears that Bill Morton’s comments about no racing history might have relied on misinformation, perhaps from Dyer? Bill was not one to make things up, but obviously whatever he had heard was incorrect.
        I never expected to see or hear anything about the car again. It’s nice to know it survived,, and continues to thrive. All GTOs are, of course, lovely, but this one has a special place in my own car history.