Class M-2: Ferrari Competition and Gran Turismo Trophy, 1966 Ferrari 330 P4 Drogo Spyder, Lawrence Stroll, New York, New York
Class M-2: Ferrari Competition and Gran Turismo Trophy, 1966 Ferrari 330 P4 Drogo Spyder, Lawrence Stroll, New York, New York

Our Favorite Race Cars from the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours

The spectators at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance were treated to some truly exceptional sights on and off the show field at the Pebble Beach Golf Links. From a Panhard et Levassor Type B1 that won the 1901 New York to Buffalo endurance race to a pair of Le Mans-winning Ford GT40s, this year’s Concours d’Elegance highlighted race cars that competed on the show field in the following classes: Ferrari Competition; BMW Centennial Prewar and Postwar; Fiat Custom Coachwork; Bizzarrini; Two-Man Indianapolis Race Cars and Ford GT40 Victory at Le Mans 50th Anniversary.

Choosing favorites at an event like the Pebble Beach Concours is tougher than it sounds, as virtually of all the entrants are the best of the best in their respective categories. While the task was difficult and we gave it our best efforts, we welcome your comments below if we missed your favorite.

In no particular order, here are the Top 15 race cars we would like to see at the SCD Garage:

1965 Iso Grifo A3/C Catarsi Competition Berlinetta
1965 Iso Grifo A3/C Catarsi Competition Berlinetta, Bruce Meyer, Beverly Hills, California – This competition berlinetta (chassis B0222) is the most successful of the Iso Grifo Bizzarrini-built A/3C works race cars in existence. It has a light fiberglass body by the yacht-builder Cantieri Nautici Catarsi and was the first A3/C with independent rear suspension and inboard disc brakes. With its potent 5.4-liter Chevy engine, driven by Regis Fraissinet and Jean de Mortemart, it finished 1st in class and 9th overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1965, achieving a top speed on the Mulsanne Straight of 186 mph — a speed matched only by the 7-liter Ford GT40s. It went on to participate in World Sports Car Championship races at the Reims 12 Hours and the Nurburgring, and later tackled the Mt. Dore Hillclimb, where it was driven by Maurice Tritingnant in his last ever race. Later owners included American actor Remington Olmsted, the Maranello Rosso Collection and Gregor Fisken. Its current caretaker acquired the car in 2012. (photo: Richard Michael Owen)
Class W: Ford GT40 Victory at Le Mans 50th Anniversary, 1966 Ford GT40 P/1046 Mk II, Robert Kauffman, Charlotte, North Carolina
1966 Ford GT40 P/1046 Mk II, Robert Kauffman, Charlotte, North Carolina – This GT40 Mk II (chassis P/1046), driven by Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon, placed first at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966, leading two other GT40s across the line for the famous 1-2-3 photo finish. Following its memorable win, the car passed to Holman & Moody and was entered in the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967, driven by Lloyd Ruby and Denny Hulme. After running among the race leaders, Ruby crashed on his 300th lap and P/1046’s racing days were over. Once repaired, this famous car was shipped around the United States as part of a Ford marketing tour. It was later rebuilt as a road-going supercar, complete with a gold metal-flake paint job. Its new owner recently restored the car to its 1966 Le Mans–winning configuration (Photo: Steve Burton. Used courtesy Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance)
1937 BMW 328 Mille Miglia Bugelfalte Roadster
1937 BMW 328 Mille Miglia ‘Bugelfalte’ Roadster, Oscar Davis, Elizabeth, New Jersey – This BMW 328 MM was originally built as a special and participated in the 1937 Le Mans 24 Hours, with A. F. P. Fane behind the wheel. It went on to compete in the 1937 Donnington Tourist Trophy, and in 1938 Fane and his co-driver, William James, raced it in the last prewar Mille Miglia, finishing 8th overall and first in class. In the fall of 1939, the car was dismantled by BMW and the chassis was used to build this streamlined race car, designed by Wilhelm Kaiser and finished by Wunibald Kamm, in preparation for the 1940 Mille Miglia. The pronounced ridge on the fenders resembled the crease in a pair of ironed trousers, giving the car its nickname of Bugelfalte (‘ironing crease’). The 1940 Mille Miglia encompassed nine laps of a 110-mile route between Brescia, Mantua and Cremona, and this roadster, driven by Hans Wencher and Rudolf Scholz, finished 6th. During the war, the roadster was given to German Minister Albert Speer, then was seized by Russia as reparations and given to MiG aircraft engineer Artem Mikoyan. He lent the car to his young son before he traded the car to Guido Adamson of Latvia in 1972 for a modern Lada! Its current caretaker acquired the car in 2010. (photo: Pavel Novitski)

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1931 Rigling and Henning Wonder Bread Special
1931 Rigling and Henning Wonder Bread Special, Pat and Gina Phinny, Carmel Valley, California – This is the imaginatively painted Wonder Bread Special that was built by the Indianapolis-based firrm of Herman Rigling and Cotton Henning, who were renowned for their race-winning Indy chassis. Although the engineering pair often used Buick straight-8 engines mounted in steel-rail frames, this car is powered by a special engine designed and built by Fred Duesenberg based on the Duesenberg Model A block and intended exclusively for racing. The Wonder Bread Special finished 12th in the 1931 Indianapolis 500 driven by Phil Shafer of Des Moines, Iowa. The car returned to the Brickyard in 1933 and it finished 17th driven by Joe Russo. Wonder Bread was among several Indy 500 sponsors who saw the benefits of this exciting form of advertising some 35 years before Colin Chapman enticed the Gold Leaf sponsorship onto his Lotus Grand Prix cars. (photo: Pavel Novitski)
Enzo Ferrari Trophy, 1956 Ferrari 290 MM Scaglietti Spyder, Les Wexner, New Albany, Ohio
1956 Ferrari 290 MM Scaglietti Spyder, Les Wexner, New Albany, Ohio – After losing out to Mercedes-Benz in the 1955 World Sportscar Championship, Ferrari recognized that it needed a more powerful car for 1956 and, at the suggestion of engineer Vittorio Jano, returned to its tried and trusted 320 bhp, 3,490 cc V12 engine to power his new sports cars. Driving solo, Juan Manuel Fangio piloted this car (chassis 0626) to 4th place in the 1956 Mille Miglia, one of the wettest on record. Then Phil Hill, Ken Wharton, Olivier Gendebien, and the Marquis de Portago took 3rd overall in the Nurburgring 1000 km. When Wolfgang (Taffy) von Trips and Peter Collins finished 2nd with it at the 1956 Swedish GP at Kristianstad, the Championship was back with Ferrari. In the spring of 1957, the car was sold to American team owner Temple Buell, and it was raced until 1964 by Masten Gregory, Jo Bonnier, Paul O’Shea, and Manfredo Lippman. The car was never crashed and is one of the most valuable cars in the world, having sold for $28.05 million to claim the highest automotive auction sale of 2015. (Photo: Steve Burton. Used courtesy Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance)

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  1. Cameron Healy and Suzy Snow run a number of cars in vintage events. Their 1949 356SL ran Rennsport V. Lawrence Stroll ran two significant Ferrari’s during this years RMMR a 1970 512M (the Penske 512M) and a 1981 512BBMM. I know Cameron and Suzy and appreciate all the cars they bring to the track . Lawrence Stroll owns my favorite race track in North America and has a son who is on the fast track to F1 fame.

    Still my question is what are these “race cars’ doing parked on grass. They would have been met with appreciation on Laguna Seca’s asphalt. On asphalt is where they belong.

    Still a great selection of “race cars” on grass or not on grass.