1936 Delahaye 135M Figoni et Falaschi Competition Coupe and 1937 Delahaye 135MS Roadste
1936 Delahaye 135M Figoni et Falaschi Competition Coupe and 1937 Delahaye 135MS Roadste

Sensuous Steel: Art Deco Automobiles – Photo Gallery

Sensuous Steel: Art Deco Automobiles – Photo Gallery Page Three

1934 Voisin Type C27 Aerosport Coupe, Collection of Merle and Peter Mullin
1934 Voisin Type C27 Aerosport Coupe, Collection of Merle and Peter Mullin
1934 Voisin Type C27 Aerosport Coupe, Collection of Merle and Peter Mullin
1934 Voisin Type C27 Aerosport Coupe, Collection of Merle and Peter Mullin
1930 Henderson KJ Streamline, Collection of Frank Westfall
1930 Henderson KJ Streamline, Collection of Frank Westfall. Powered by a 1,200-cc, 40-brake horsepower, in-line four-cylinder engine, the Streamline could exceed 100 mph. It was reportedly hard to ride and the complex curved body was heavy and was difficult to make.
1930 Henderson KJ Streamline, Collection of Frank Westfall
1930 Henderson KJ Streamline, Collection of Frank Westfall.
1940 Indian Chief, Collection of Gary Sanford
1940 Indian Chief, Collection of Gary Sanford
1940 Indian Chief, Collection of Gary Sanford
1940 Indian Chief, Collection of Gary Sanford
1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt, Collection of Chrysler Group, LLC
1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt, Collection of Chrysler Group, LLC
1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt, Collection of Chrysler Group, LLC
1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt, Collection of Chrysler Group, LLC

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Show Comments (21)

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    1. This one, Dirk, is, I believe, the FIRST event featured in SCD (not their fault) within a thousand miles of me (near Houston).

  1. Beautiful cars, especially the delahaye teardrop coupes + the talbot -lagot-150c coupes. I wish !!!!

    1. I agree, Bryan, about the F&F cars. On a different plane. But let’s stress: the cars are all beautiful.
      Even the motorcycles; I’ve always kinda liked the looks of the Indian (my Dad rode one on the Texas
      Highway Patrol in the early 30s), but it never occurred to me that those fenders were Art Deco.

  2. What a wonderful “re-purposing” of a grand old post office building! Too bad those great autos were only visiting, but Nashville is convenientl to a large population in the SE.

    1. Absolutely, Chuck. When the USPS finally goes broke (years ago, really), those old
      Depression era buildings will all be available for useful enterprises. This one was
      magic, though.

  3. Not the first such show. Phoenix Art Museum did Curves of Steel a few years ago and it was a blockbuster. The catalog was beautifully done too. Love photos of this one. Thanks.

    1. I think several galleries have done car shows. I know the High Museum here in Atlanta did one, but I reading this carefully I see this: “first fine art museum exhibition devoted to vehicles of the Art Deco era”. I think the Art Deco focus is the distinction here.

      Looking forward to a Nashville trip soon…

      1. Don’t know if it was featured as I don’t think I was on to SCD at the time. Turns out the exhibition was in 2007. Time flies. The catalog “Curves of Steel” has been re-printed and is available on Amazon or from the Museum store. Check it out. Cars and photos are fantastic. Well worth adding to your library.

    1. Yes, Red! Had the old Indian look ever seemed Art Deco to you? It will always be so, in my eyes,
      after this. Perfect placement; no Harley, and certainly no Asian bike, would qualify.

  4. This are in my wishing list!!!!!! What about Rolls and Bentleys???????????Thanks for the photos, just mouth watering………V. Orsi

    1. Sorry, Vittorio. They’re too damned stodgy. This was 30’s STYLE; no dowdy old Brits allowed.

  5. Well, this works out great! I go to Atlanta every Labor Day wknd (NASCAR race) and am always looking for things to do on my return trip. I never take a direct route back to Toronto and I can guarantee there’ll be a Poncho with Ontario plates in the parking lot around Sept. 3. Tres cool and looking forward to seeing these beasts in 3D instead of a flat screen!

  6. Clearly the sense of style and flair that is so prevalent in that period is mostly gone.
    What incredible lines, simply beautiful!